Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center Using KindVR in Emergency Department

Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center is using KindVR in their Emergency Department on a daily basis. We’re proud to be supporting their patients during difficult medical procedures. Recently. Kaiser Permanente shared a video on their twitter feed to showcase how they are using virtual reality. This story was also featured on Fox 61 News.

Cure 4 The Kids Clinic using KindVR on Channel 13 KTNV News

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Virtual reality goggles help ease the pain of cancer treatment for kids

For children facing serious illnesses like cancer, the treatment process can be scary because of the physical pain. But now thanks to a new grant, one local treatment center has a high-tech way to help ease their pain.

Cure 4 The Kids is a nonprofit clinic that treats children with serious medical conditions including cancer. Thanks to a grant written in part by neuropsychologist Dr. Danielle Bello, the clinic has just received 3 sets of virtual reality goggles. The VR goggles are made by KindVR and the experiences are designed to help distract children and ease their pain while undergoing treatment.

(Read the full story on KNTV.com)

St. Jude explores VR as a distraction technique for the pain crises of sickle cell disease.

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Virtual Reality: A Distraction from Sickle Cell Pain

St. Jude explores virtual reality as a distraction technique for children and teens undergoing the pain crises of sickle cell disease.

By Mike O’Kelly; Photo by Peter Barta

Patients in a new St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital study will soon dive deep into the ocean for a marine experience alongside tropical fish, friendly seals and curious dolphins. While launching multi-colored bubbles at a variety of aquatic life, they’ll navigate an underwater terrain of sunken ruins and stone columns.

Swimsuits, scuba gear and beach towels won’t be necessary—the underwater journey is part of a new virtual reality experience designed to distract children with sickle cell disease who have acute pain crises.

People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells that are sickle-shaped and hard, making it difficult for their cells to move through blood vessels and deliver oxygen to body tissues. Pain crises are the recurring episodes that occur when normal blood flow is disrupted.

The pain is different for each individual. Some children get complete relief from routine pain medicines while others need more time or increased dosage before the pain subsides.

Three years ago, Doralina Anghelescu, MD, director of the hospital’s Pain Management Service, began a clinical trial to see if adding the drug gabapentin to the standard regimen would lessen acute pain from sickle cell crises more quickly or completely. The study is ongoing, but when presented with the opportunity of including virtual reality technology as a distraction tool, the researchers decided to try it.

The virtual reality project will include 76 patients—half will receive virtual reality sessions and the other half will receive standard treatment. St. Jude is partnering with the Memphis-based Methodist Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center on the clinical trial. This is the first study at St. Jude to use virtual reality, helping further position the institution as a leader in pain management for pediatric patients. (Read the Full Story on St. Jude Children's Research Hospital's website)

Akron Children's Hospital using KindVR

 Leukemia patient Tommy Peachock, 12, got lost in an underwater world, thanks to help from volunteer Jessica Benson and the hospital’s new virtual reality (VR) technology.

Leukemia patient Tommy Peachock, 12, got lost in an underwater world, thanks to help from volunteer Jessica Benson and the hospital’s new virtual reality (VR) technology.

Outfitted with a headset and controller, 12-year-old Tommy Peachock sat cross-legged on his hospital bed and floated through a bright, blue sea. His head swiveled side to side, up and down, as he watched whales and dolphins swim up to him.

It was Tommy’s first experience with virtual reality (VR), a technology that’s finding new and varied uses in medical settings.

Akron Children’s Hospital landed 6 units in August from KindVR, a California company. KindVR works with a number of hospitals researching various medical uses of VR. The goal is to help distract and calm young patients who are in pain or facing medical procedures.

Research has shown that VR distraction is effective at reducing pain. More studies are underway to see if VR is valuable in different hospital settings like emergency rooms and before surgery.

Tommy is a leukemia patient of the Showers Family Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Disorders. He was hospitalized recently after spiking a fever. His family is from Hubbard in Trumbull County.

Tommy was dressed and ready to go home on this morning.

 Solomon Hubbs, 10, dialysis and sickle cell patient

Solomon Hubbs, 10, dialysis and sickle cell patient

With his mother Sharon watching, hospital volunteer Jessica Benson slipped an Android phone into the headset, showed Tommy the controller and started the KindVR Aqua program.

With his controller, Tommy blew virtual bubbles at sea creatures and objects, which turned them into rainbow colors. Tommy was absorbed in the 15-minute underwater journey.

About halfway through, he broke silence. “There’s a seal in front of me,” he called out.

Acquiring VR units was Jessica’s idea.  A former substitute schoolteacher, she is enthusiastic about VR, pointing out that it helps reduce pain and thus reliance painkillers. She spreads the virtues of VR every chance she gets. (Read the full story on the Akron Children's Hospital website)

Children's Hospital of Wisconsin's Use of VR for Oncology Patients

 13-year-old Emanuel found virtual reality to be a welcome distraction during a recent procedure at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin  ( Image via CHW Blog )

13-year-old Emanuel found virtual reality to be a welcome distraction during a recent procedure at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin (Image via CHW Blog)

All around Emanuel Monge was bright blue water and rainbow-colored fish. Smiling sea lions passed by, as gray whales soared overhead. Dancing dolphins bobbed above an array of artifacts from a shipwreck long ago.

The 13-year-old glided through the ocean, taking in the sights and sounds surrounding him. He flung balls at fish, discovering that the contact zapped them into neon colors. He learned if he launched enough balls, he’d get an ancient column to topple over to the ocean floor.

 11-year-old Toben, a patient at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, tried out virtual reality earlier this year  ( Image via CHW Blog )

11-year-old Toben, a patient at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, tried out virtual reality earlier this year (Image via CHW Blog)

After a few more minutes of looking around and playing, his boat suddenly came into view. The next thing he knew he was back to where he had been: the MACC Fund Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Emanuel’s underwater adventure had been a virtual reality experience offered to him as a way to ease his anxiety during a transfusion.  (Read the Full Article on the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Blog)

Upworthy.com Story about KindVR at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin

 Dr. Hoag has been letting her patients try VR informally, and is getting ready to conduct a clinical study on its benefits.  Image via  Northwestern Mutual .

Dr. Hoag has been letting her patients try VR informally, and is getting ready to conduct a clinical study on its benefits. Image via Northwestern Mutual.

Jenny Hoag, a pediatric psychologist at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, tells the story of one patient, Jamie*, whose experience demonstrates just how distressing regular procedures can be for kids with cancer and other chronic diseases:

"I had worked with him since the beginning of his treatment, and he really, really struggled," she says. "He would get here and immediately feel nauseous and anxious and would almost always vomit, sometimes more than once, before we even did anything."

  Image to via  Northwestern Mutual .

Image to via Northwestern Mutual.

Hoag's job is to come up with ways to help kids conquer that discomfort and anxiety. But in Jamie's case, he wasn't interested.

Jamie rejected Hoag’s coping mechanisms, but once she suggested virtual reality, his curiosity won out.

Hoag brought in a virtual reality program that makes the wearer feel as though they're underwater, being pushed along calmly while viewing colorful fish, ships, and other distracting scenes. (Read the full story on Upworthy.com)

MedicalExpo Article on Sickle Cell Pain Research @ UCSF Oakland

 Courtesy of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Courtesy of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

A pilot study in San Francisco has shown that virtual reality (VR) can help children and teens escape from the pain of sickle cell disease, and future studies are planned to ease discomfort for youths being treated for cancer.

The idea came from video game developer Simon Robertson, who also happened to be a volunteer at the University of California San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland.

Video: UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland

UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland published a video highlighting their pioneering work researching the use of virtual reality to help sickle cell patients manage their pain. Briana Nathaniel, a participant in the research study shares how VR plays a role in her hospital experience. Primary Investigator of the study Dr. Anne Marsh and Simon Robertson of KindVR discuss the potential of VR to help patients. 

San Francisco Chronicle features KindVR & UCSF

We're proud to be mentioned on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper today. The story details our research study at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland evaluating the use of virtual reality to help patients with sickle cell disease manage their pain crisis. 

 Photo: Michael Noble Jr., The Chronicle

Photo: Michael Noble Jr., The Chronicle

"Briana Nathaniel, 14, lies listless in her hospital bed, exhausted from days of nearly unbearable pain. Her voice is small, barely a whisper, and even lifting her hand seems to take enormous effort.

Half an hour later, she’s transformed. A virtual reality visor covers half her face, but it can’t hide her grin. She’s sitting up, her hands waving around as she calls out, “Hi, dolphin! Hi, whale!” "  (Read more

 Photo: Michael Noble Jr., The Chronicle

Photo: Michael Noble Jr., The Chronicle

It’s amazing. You walk into the room, and they’re like a different kid for these 30 minutes.
— Dr. Anne Marsh